Winnipeg School of Communication

Style Guide

Please familiarize yourself with our in-house style guide when submitting work to Winnsox. While there are many style guides to choose from, as a para-academic journal we believe in providing our readers with as much information as possible. Nothing is more frustrating for a general readership than learning, and thus deciphering, impenetrable academic nomenclature and obscure stylistic conventions.

Our inspiration comes from the well established and “classic” approach to quality academic publishing represented by Harvard and Oxford. There is very little difference between the Harvard and Oxford style guides, and they dovetail nicely with the Chicago Manual of Style. For authors that have used these styles before, writing for us will be effortless. This page will be constantly updated, so check back often to learn more.

Endnotes

For ease of use, especially when reading on a screen medium, do not use in-text citations. Simply use superscript numerals and correlate them with your endnotes as indicated in the Chicago Manual of Style. For basic bibliographic citations, follow the examples below. Use Ibid when an identical endnote immediately follows the previous source. If the source remains the same, but the page number changes, use Ibid followed by a comma, then the page number (indicated by “p.”).

Single Author, first instance:

First Name Last Name, Title: Subtitle (Publisher’s City: Publisher’s Name, Year of Publication), Page Number.

  1. Marshall McLuhan, Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1964), p. 69.
  2. Ibid., 73.
  3. Ibid.

Single Author, second instance:

Last Name Only, Title Only, Page Number.

  1. McLuhan, Understanding Media, p.19.

Two Authors, first instance:

First Name Last Name and First Name Last Name, Title: Subtitle (Publisher’s City: Publisher’s Name, Year of Publication), Page Number.

  1. Marshall McLuhan and Eric McLuhan, Laws of Media: The New Science (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1988), p. 88.
  2. Marshall McLuhan and Bruce R. Powers, The Global Village: Transformations in World Life and Media in the 21st Century (New York: Oxford University Press, 1989), p. 30.
  3. Ibid, p. 31.

Two Authors, second instance:

Last Name and Last Name, Title, Page Number.

  1. McLuhan and McLuhan, Laws of Media, p. 26.
  2. McLuhan and Powers, The Global Village, p. 57.
  3. Ibid.

Three Authors, first instance:

First Name Last Name, First Name Last Name, and First Name Last Name, Title: Subtitle (Publisher’s City: Publisher’s Name, Year of Publication), Page Number.

  1. Marshall McLuhan, Kathy Hutchon, and Eric McLuhan, City as Classroom: Understanding Language and Media (Agincourt: The Book Society of Canada Limited, 1977), p. 151.

Three Authors, second instance:

Last Name, Last Name, and Last Name, Title, p. 152.

  1. McLuhan, Hutchon, and McLuhan, City as Classroom, p. 96.